Saturday, September 17, 2005

Follow Up: Does This Say "Love"?


newtribetattoo_love2.jpg

Reader Kitsune has emailed me the follow up with New Tribe Tattoo after she sent them a letter stating the mistake(s) they have done. The diplomatic exchange ends with New Tribe Tattoo’s final statement:

“Hey, here's a portion of the flash sheet [shown above] that this design was taken from, written out by an Asian gentleman. We do not read or write the language and we do warn clients to have it verified BEFORE getting it tattooed. We tattoo kanji in good faith, but like I said, we do not speak the language... It is the customer's responsibility before they put it on their body, no? If you want, you can post this page to that forum [Hanzi Smatter] for others to see. We also have the full set available for viewing in the shop!”

Personally I am curious about the identity of the calligrapher, also known as the “Asian Gentleman”.

The moral of the story: Buyer Beware.


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10 comments:

  1. It looks like running style calligraphy -- and it looks like decent calligraphy, to me. But I checked and it's not the standard running-style form of 愛.

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  2. what about 愛情 的 情 It would be missing the heart radical but... I could also be off-base because my knowledge of 草書 is very limited.

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  3. The saddest thing is that the tattoo artist did a very good job replicating what he was given. Most of the errors here are simply sloppy work - strokes missing, etc. This artist did a very careful reproduction of his source material.

    I'd imagine that the artist is pissed as well. Kind of like somebody making a business decision or turning in a scholastic report and then discovering the article they based it on was made up.

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  4. According to my mom who's into traditional Chinese calligraphy (and is supposed to be quite good), all the words in the picture are correct. They are merely the script written version of Chinese. There are so many fonts for Chinese over the 2000+ history. The circled word is in Chinese script. but still an older way of writting it.

    Script chinese is very common among the very educated local Hong Kong. My friends use it to piss me off since I can't even read simple characters if they write it in script.

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  5. The calligraphy looks quite ugly to me (especially the other 爱), but then I'm not an expert.

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  6. There is running script 行書, and there are two or three main types of grass script 草書: 章草 and 今草 (and possibly 狂草).
    The first, Zhangcao, is a grass script based on the clerical script 隸書. Jincao, or what we normally call grass script, is based on the regular script 楷書. The character shown here is most probably the zhangcao version of 愛--though more research would be needed to find out exactly what style of zhangcao it is.

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  7. That circled one looks like 麦 to me . . . Wheaty love.

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  8. the first one (circled) doesnt look like the LOVE I got. The second one does. I hope I didnt get "fuck off" on my back. :-(
    now im worried.

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  9. With a brief glance over some charts I had around, it looks most to me like the oldest Japanese (hentaigana?) form of the hiragana り(ri). I'm not sure if this had a meaning in ancient Japanese/Chinese, but the match is almost dead on. I can't seem to find an image of it online, but I could take a picture of the chart I guess.

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  10. It definitely isn't "love", and doesn't look like any character that has a special meaning to me, if I have to say, it's a "wheat". By the way, I am Chinese, and I know Japanese well. What you guys refer to as "kanji" means "Chinese characters", well, I expect those who claim to know Japanese to know this. In Japanese,they have "kanji" and then "hiragana" and "katakana", which were developed from seperate parts of Chinese characters.

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